DECIBEL INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL

BASED ON THE PROLOGUE TO THE NOVEL INVISIBLE MAN BY RALPH ELLISON · SEMINAL NOVEL · ROYAL NORTHERN COLLEGE OF MUSIC ·

Film by Nomad Creative Consultancy

SYNOPSIS OF INVISIBLE MAN

INVISIBLE MAN investigates the plight of individuals who feel that they are being marginalised by society despite their best efforts to secure inclusion.

The narrative focuses on one man’s final attempt to legitimise his humanity through the construction of a personal philosophy of self-imprisonment, metaphysical fantasy and subterfuge. 

Illegally occupying the basement of an attractive high rise apartment block we are introduced to the nocturnal world of the Invisible Man who has barricaded himself into his home or hole in the ground to escape the harrowing psychological effects of marginalisation. Having spent the last ten years divesting him-self of all emotional ties and yearnings our protagonist is suddenly possessed by an extreme psychological compulsion to break from his life of seclusion.

In an attempt to assert his intellectual superiority and his cultural masculinity the Invisible Man emerges from his nocturnal world of obscurity to confront head on the forces that drove him underground and now threatens his invincibility.

THE CREATIVE PROCESS & SHOWCASE 

Invisible Man is a vivid look into the distorting mirror of racism and a brilliant realisation of a seminal text. It is my sincere hope that Paul Morris, Artistic Director of Crying In The Wilderness, will be inundated with invitations to tour the production. Because the Invisible Man deserves to be seen by everyone.....
— John O'Donoghue, Theatre Critic, DAO

Photography by Sarah Nunn

THE TREATMENT

The theatricality existed within three states of consciousness.

These spheres of existence enhanced within a multidisciplinary approach to nourish specifically the psychedelic elements and nuances of our narrative.

Showcase filmed by Decibel at the Arts Council

George Eggay gives an engaging performance as a man trying to assert intellectual superiority while freeing himself of emotional ties. The simple set and limited props add to the piece, with the audience accepting that it is 1950s America.
— Parvin Kumar Ramchurn, The Stage

Special Thanks to The Ralph and Fanny Ellison Charitable Trust Foundation